Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from March, 2009

Confessions of a Lazy Programmer: Maven the Easy Way

I have been brushing up on a few different technologies lately, and all of the tutorials & books I have gone through rely on Maven for building a project skeleton. Since my focus hasn't been on Maven itself (instead it is Spring and Tapestry), I have been blindly following instructions from the command line. For very basic projects, this has worked fine.


Anything more complex, and I see things like this:
Since I wasn't trying to set up any database connectivity, this is thoroughly annoying. I was only trying to validate that I can build a skeleton project so I can move on to installing and configuring the Tapestry plug-ins for Eclipse.

Since I'm not interested in learning the guts of Maven yet, I did what any good (read: "lazy") programmer would do: I installed the Eclipse plugin for Maven and used Eclipse to create my project. Thanks to Borut BolĨina's great walkthrough, this only took a few minutes. (He has a complete series on creating apps with Tap…

User Groups: When Nerds of a Feather Flock Together

I left tonight's Detroit Java User Group meeting thinking again how amazingly useful the group is for programmers. No individual can be an expert in all new technologies. Listening to someone else summarize what they find good, bad or ugly about a particular framework or language really helps me decide:
What I want to dive into next, just because it's interesting.If there is an easier way to handle a common implementation, testing or deployment problem.What I might need to learn in order to stay current.

Today's talks were on a these open source tools (explanations are based on my understanding from the 15-minute talks - corrections & clarifications welcome):
FitNesse - a software testing tool framework. Unlike JUnit which focuses on very specific tests with hard-coded data, FitNesse is intended to handle soup-to-nuts acceptance testing. It uses a Wiki to both describe the tests and hold the test data. DarkStar - A Java-based multiplayer game server. It handles t…

Pandora: Music While You Code

If you're not already using Pandora, you really should check it out. It is a great way to listen to new music that still falls within your normal range of tastes. Just give it some songs or artists that you like as "seeds", and then give a thumbs up or down to songs as they play. You'll end up with a radio station that plays music you like all of the time. The most amazing part about it is that it's free. They have a few audio ads (I haven't heard one in a week or two) and the usual banner ads, which aren't at all intrusive if you keep the browser minimized.

My friend Dave recently posted about an Adobe Air client for Pandora radio, which I just downloaded today & is working fine. The only real advantage to it is that it minimizes to the system tray instead of to the taskbar in Windows. This is helpful if you use multiple virtual desktops (I use VirtualWin) and want to access it from any desktop.

My Pandora station is mostly Indie music. Check i…